Why A Christian Should Celebrate Passover…In My Humble Opinion



Not to make you jealous or anything, but I’m sitting on my porch at my beach house with my morning cup of coffee as I write this post. Listening to the birds and seeing the sun peer through the screen onto the wood flooring has my brain reflecting on so many things. As we come upon one of the best holidays in Christianity, I wanted to share with you my personal perspective on something. This may seem like a bold statement to some but hear me out…Well for starters, while I am not an expert on the Jewish religion I do have some credibility in this area because I am a Jew, born and raised. In all fairness, I will let you know that I did convert to Christianity in November 2000, and was baptized as a Christian. I am not a Messianic Jew – which are “Jews for Jesus”; I identify myself as a Christian. I have my reasons for “picking a side”. Feel free to message me, as this post is not about my conversion. But the fact is, I am a Jew and will always be a Jew because I was born into the Jewish faith. I celebrated the major holidays with my family – Hanukah, Passover and Rosh Hoshanah. My children are considered half Jewish, because the bloodline for Jews runs through the mother. So although my ex-husband was not a Jew, should they ever decide to follow the Jewish faith; since they are practicing Christians; they would not have to convert to Judaism.  Being Jewish, in my opinion; has as much to do with family tradition as it does the belief that Jesus wasn’t the Messiah. That sticking point is what separates Jews from Christians; the Old Testament vs the New Testament.

So why as Christians, should we celebrate Passover, specifically? For starters…Jesus was a Jew. Born and bred a practicing Jew. Christianity didn’t exist while Jesus was alive. Did you know that? Christianity didn’t come to be until Jesus moved the big rock from his Tomb and came back to earth for 3 days…That is when Easter became Easter…his re-birth, the Resurrection!  And then many Jews believed Jesus was the Son of God, Son of Man…because he rose from the dead! That’s when the New Testament begins! So many of my Christian friends don’t realize this. Christianity and Judaism didn’t co-exist until God sent him back to earth to show those that didn’t believe he was God’s son, that in fact he was the Messiah. I think that’s pretty darned amazing and awesome and cool and every other adjective to describe how wonderful this is! This is the Good News!

News Alert! The Last Supper was a Passover Sedar!

The Passover Sedar, hence Last Supper, was Jesus’ last supper. He knew he was going to be crucified, dead and buried. But the Passover Meal is a traditional meal, aka Sedar,  that celebrates the Jew’s escape from bondage in Egypt. The elements of a Passover Sedar all exemplify the bondage and escape through specific rituals. This is what Jesus did his entire life as a Jew. Passover is a celebratory meal! The Last Supper was a Sedar! It makes sense to me that Christians today celebrate together with a Sedar to further enhance their understanding of the symbolic importance of the Last Supper from another perspective.

When I was married we had a group of friends from church that we had a Supper Club with for over 10 years. Each month the host family chose the theme for the menu and provided the libations and main part of the meal. Did I mention libations? Oh, yeah I did! They doled out what each family could contribute. Those dinners were some of the best memories. The kids gradually stopped coming as they got older and to cool to hang with us old folks, but great memories will always be with all of us during that time. One year my Mom and I led a Passover Sedar for our friends. They absolutely loved it! Let’s not forget to mention if you haven’t ever had matzoh ball soup, brisket, and noodle koogle (look it up!), you really are missing out on some damned good food! I have some of the fondest memories with my cousins and my Grandma Rose at our Sedar’s. I can taste her matzoh balls right now just remembering how they melted in my mouth!

So as we celebrate Easter, think about how Easter became Easter. Remember that Jesus led an entire life for 32 years on this earth as a Jew. Understand the value in knowing that not only is Jesus the Messiah (should you believe in Him), but that the Passover Sedar is part of his upbringing and his family tradition. I think it’s just a great perspective that further brings me closer to Him. I feel doubly blessed that my blood line is His, technically.

While I haven’t done a Sedar myself in many years, it’s on my bucket list to do once again. It takes days of preparation…no lie! So time isn’t always on my side because I don’t prioritize it as if I was a practicing Jew. But that said, I plan to once again with my Mom. It’s really a beautiful meal.

As a fairly new Christian, Easter is actually my favorite holiday. It symbolizes not only the birth of Christianity, but my re-newal of my faith each and every year as a Christian.

I guess you could say that the greatest Prince of all is The Prince of Peace! So if I never find my human prince, I’m perfectly content because I do have in my heart the best Prince ever!

Be Well and Be Blessed my friends!

 

3 COMMENTS

  1. Charity Dell | 17th Apr 17

    As a Black Pentecostal believer who celebrates the Shalosh Regalim within the context of the Christian/
    Church Year, there are several good reasons to hold a Passover celebration within your own family
    and/or church fellowship. Although most Christians “get it” that the Passover connects us to the Last
    Supper and Passion narratives of the Gospels, it is helpful to remember that the Exodus event ALSO
    teaches us valuable lessons about how YAHWEH Elohim regards human systems of slavery and
    degradation. The God Who accepted the sacrifice of the Lamb of God during Passover, is ALSO the
    God of JUSTICE, Who hears the cry of the “widow, the orphan and the stranger” (Deuteronomy 10:18)
    and avenges them, punishing their oppressors.(Zechariah 7:10)

    1. Passover celebration also sensitizes us to human suffering and challenges us to find ways
    to alleviate it. The Liberation of the “Mixed Multitude” (Exodus 12:38) clearly reveals how fiercely God
    loved the Gentile peoples and nations and had fore-ordained their deliverance from Egyptian bondage.
    The “Mixed Multitude” was composed of African, Afro-Asiatic, Levantine and Mediterranean ethnic
    groups and individuals who were also oppressed by the Egyptians. Many of these people would not
    have had families or tribal support, as they were often captives of war; and victims of kidnapping raids
    carried out by slave traders and human traffickers. The thousands of unnamed people literally raped,
    beaten and ground into the dust by the Egyptian slave system were also beloved by YAHWEH, Who
    decided to free them from slavery along with the Hebrews. This multitude included Egyptian slaves,
    who were also victims of the national system of oppression.

    2. In many ways, the story of the “Mixed Multitude” demonstrates the heart of God, Who loves all
    He created in His image. Thousands of Gentiles escaped the Egyptian “house of bondage”, because
    they had seen six plagues over the course of a year and decided to trust YAHWEH. Just prior to the seventh plague of hail, some Egyptians sheltered their servants, livestock and themselves, and thus avoid the
    horrific hailstorm that kills animals and people, and flattens trees and plants. The Mixed Multitude
    obey Moses’ instructions, and also slaughter a lamb/kid; strike the lintels and doorposts with the blood;
    eat matzah, bitter herbs and roasted lamb; stay in their houses until morning–and thus are safe from the
    Destroyer of the firstborn. They leave Egypt with the Hebrews, and YAHWEH creates a pillar of fire
    to shield them from Pharoah’s armies; God splits the Red Sea for them as they flee with Isaac’s
    descendants to a new life, and they journey to Sinai with the Israelites.

    3. In many ways, this story of the Mixed Multitude is a precursor to how God will deliver all humanity
    through the sacrifice of the Passover Lamb of God. It is the heart of the Exodus story and reflects
    how God not only remembered His covenant with Avraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph, but also reminds
    us that He is the God Who includes Gentiles and Jews in His “mighty acts” of deliverance!

    So YES, Christians–Jewish and Gentile–are “entitled” to celebrate the Passover, as the “God of
    the spirits of all flesh” (Numbers 27:16) delivered ALL Who trusted Him in Egypt and looked to
    Him for liberation from slavery.

  2. athomefeelin | 14th Apr 17

    What a great post! I agree, it is important to celebrate, however, I have never participated in a Sedar. Maybe it’s time to start.

    • staceyrhill@gmail.com | 14th Apr 17

      It’s a great meal and you will learn so much!

Leave A Comment

Leave a Reply